As Sabrina Inowlocki explains, Eusebius inherited from writers such as Philo and Clement of Alexandria the notion that Moses was an “ideal political leader, prophet, legislator and priest” (“Eusebius’s Appropriation,” p. 242). Eusebius’ compromising stand at Nicaea apparently reflected a … For a general introduction to the Life of Constantine, please see the commentary on I.8. However, the emperor, knowing that his help had come from God, the “author (αἴτιος, aitios) of his victory (νίκη, nikē),” did not indulge in these acclamations. He became acquainted with the presbyter Dorotheus in Antioch and probably received exegetical instruction from him. Skip to main content.sg. Eusebius wrote his life and preserved his letters so that his policy would continue. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1999. Trackback URI | Search. The Life of the Blessed Emperor Constantine. Account & Lists Account Returns & Orders. Moreover, his comment that most reject the story as fiction, implies that he has in mind a non-Christian audience. Eusebius Pamphilius: Church History, Life of Constantine, Oration in Praise of Constantine by Eusebius Pamphilius. Eusebius also makes comparisons with Alexander the Great (see the commentary on I.8) and Cyrus, but in these cases he is portrayed as superior. Tertullian claims that these glorious displays of the emperor’s power and authority bestow on him such a high degree of honour that it is necessary for a (hypothetical) voice to remind him that he is “but a man.” In Eusebius’s description, Constantine plays down the acclamations of the Roman people and the senate, who are eager to lavish praise upon him. Its Introduction and Commentary open up the many important issues the Life of Constantine raises. His great merit, from … His exact date and place of birth are unknown, and little is known of his youth. Cart All. In Eusebius of Caesarea …in 337, he wrote his Life of Constantine, a panegyric that possesses some historical value, chiefly because of its use of primary sources. This similarity was undoubtedly played up by Eusebius and Constantine himself. Eusebius took part in the expulsion of Athanasius of Alexandria (335), Marcellus of Ancyra (c. 336), and Eustathius of Antioch (c. 337). There, serving as theological adviser to Constantine I, Eusebius extolled the emperor’s efforts to unify Christian doctrine. A reading from EUSEBIUS PAMPHILUS OF CAESAREA, THE LIFE OF THE BLESSED EMPEROR CONSTANTINE, beginning in CHAPTER XXVI: [For use on the Victory Feast of Saxa Ruba, Order of Centurions] CONSTANTINE regarded the entire world as one immense body, and perceived that the head of it all, the royal city of the Roman empire, was bowed down by the weight of a tyrannous oppression … Eusebius of Caesarea (/juːˈsiːbiəs/; Greek: Εὐσέβιος, Eusébios; AD 260/265 – 339/340), also known as Eusebius Pamphili, was a Greek historian of Christianity, exegete, and Christian polemicist. While in Tertullian’s day the emperor’s triumphs were viewed as idolatrous spectacles, where the emperor was venerated unduly, and God’s hand in Rome’s success was ignorantly unrecognised, Constantine’s triumph is described by Eusebius as the glorious moment at which the emperor played down his own achievements, and recognised God’s role in his triumph. Created by JRZ. the persecuting emperors who had preceded him, and freed his people (in 313 CE the Edict of Milan established legal tolerance of Christianity in the empire). Around 313, about the time of Constantine's Edict of Milan, Eusebius became bishop of the Palestinian city. Eusebius of Caesarea. This said, some early Christian authors did try to represent the Christians as a people, or even a “race” (genos) (see, for example, the commentary on Athenagoras of Athens, Supplication for the Christians I). Eusebius of Caesarea in Palestine (the Roman empire offered many cities with the name), sometimes known as 'Pamphilus' or the 'son of Pamphilus,' was born a little after A.D. 260, became bishop of Caesarea about 313 and lived there until his death in 339. (New York, The Christian literature company, etc., etc, 1890) (page images at HathiTrust) There is a double notion of peoplehood implied here, although not stated explicitly, as while it was the existing Christian people who had particularly suffered under the previous rulers, the presentation of Constantine in the text more generally is as a divinely chosen leader who will lead the Roman people as a whole to the true religion of Christ.The idea of the Christians as a “people” does not really appear explicitly in the New Testament, and even before Caracalla’s edict of 212 CE many Christians were Romans, or belonged to a different ethnè. Eusebius of CaesareaThe Life of the Blessed Emperor Constantine. Interestingly, the second-century Christian author Tertullian, in his Apology XXX.2, makes rhetorical use of the Roman triumph to support his argument that Rome’s rulers are ignorant if they do not comprehend that it is God who allows them to succeed in their dominion. Like Moses, Constantine destroyed the tyrants, i.e. It was never completed due to the death of Eusebius in 339. This English translation is the first based on modern critical editions. How the Market-Town of Gaza was made a City for its Profession of … Moreover, we see the Christianisation of one of Rome’s most prominent symbolic traditions, the triumphal entry into the city after a successful military campaign (for one detailed description of such an event, see the commentary on Ovid, Tristia IV.2.1-74, where the poet imagines the glory of Tiberius’s triumph after his return from Germany in 7 BCE) . This said, as Hollerich states, the choosing of a “biblical exemplum” would have “special appeal for a Christian audience,” in a way that figures such as Alexander and Cyrus could not (“Myth and History,” p. 425). This is part of a sustained comparison between the two figures that appears throughout the Life of Constantine, whereby the emperor is modelled after the patriarch in a bid to portray him as a divinely sanctioned leader and legislator (on Constantine and Moses, see the commentary on I.12). Eusebius of Caesarea (c. AD 263–339) also called Eusebius Pamphili, was a Roman historian. Eusebius : Life of Constantine The Life of Constantine, written by Eusebius of Caesarea (260-339 C.E) is a story written in the memory of Constantine the Great. For example, see the commentary on the Arch of Constantine, whose inscription states that Constantine “avenged the state in just battle from the tyrant and all his adherents” (see also on the theme of Constantine as a liberator from tyranny Life of Constantine I.39; Nummus depicting the head of Constantine and the labarum spearing a snake (337 CE)).This particular aspect of Constantinian propaganda is here taken up by Eusebius and given an obvious Christian infusion, with Constantine compared to the most famous biblical figure who led his people away from tyrannous rule with the help of the Supreme God. Des milliers de livres avec la livraison chez vous en 1 jour ou en magasin avec -5% de réduction . The tone somewhat seems to be giving high praise to Constantine commenting on the deeds of Constantine. It was never completed due to the death of Eusebius in 339. Victor Constantinus, Maximus Augustus, to Eusebius. Achetez et téléchargez ebook Life of Constantine (English Edition): Boutique Kindle - Theology : Amazon.fr Life of Constantine (English Edition) eBook: Eusebius Of Caesarea: Amazon.fr Passer au contenu principal He became the bishop of Caesarea Maritima about 314 AD. The passage essentially acts within Eusebius’s narrative as proof of the emperor’s piety and devotion to the Christian God who had enabled him to succeed in battle and emerge victorious as the sole ruler of the empire. For a general introduction to the Life of Constantine, please see the commentary on I.8. Noté /5. Comments are closed. In addition, the figure of Moses also provided Eusebius with justification for “behaviour that appeared to contradict traditional Christian views on the taking of life” (Hollerich, “The Comparison,” p. 81). Eusebius remained in the Emperor's favour throughout this time and more than once was exonerated with the explicit approval of the Emperor Constantine. Other sources connected with this document: Eusebius of Caesarea, Life of Constantine I.39. This document has been generated from XSL (Extensible Stylesheet Language) source with RenderX XEP Formatter, version 3.7.3 Client Academic. How the Copies were provided. Moses is clearly an important figure to Eusebius. Achetez neuf ou d'occasion The emperor, Eusebius claims, did not want attention to be drawn away from God, who was ultimately responsible for his victory. Indeed, the similarity between Augustus and Constantine is implied in artistic representations of the latter, which looked to represent Constantine as “a new Augustus” who would usher in a new age of glory and prosperity for the Roman people (Jaś Elsner, Imperial Rome, p. 61; see the commentary on the Colossus of Constantine). Read More Other sources connected with this document: “Myth and History in Eusebius’ De Vita Constantini: “Religion and Politics in the Writings of Eusebius: Reassessing the First ‘Court Theologian’”, “The Comparison of Moses and Constantine in Eusebius of Caesarea’s, “Eusebius’s Appropriation of Moses in an Apologetic Context”, Moses in Biblical and Extra-Biblical Traditions, about Eusebius of Caesarea, Life of Constantine I.39, about Eusebius of Caesarea, Life of Constantine I.8, about Nummus depicting the head of Constantine and the labarum spearing a snake (337 CE), Nummus depicting the head of Constantine and the labarum spearing a snake (337 CE), Relief panels, round reliefs and frieze over left (west) arch, from south, Round reliefs and frieze over right (east) arch, from south, Detail of relief panel, south side, right panel of left arch, Detail of north plinth on second column from east, viewed from east, with Victoria (left) and prisoners (right), Round relief, south side, far left, showing the departure for the hunt, West: Profectio (departure for the battle from Milan), South West, Obsidio (the Siege of Verona), South east: Proelium (Constantine’s troops defeating Maxentius’s army in battle), East: Ingressus (Constantine and his troops march into Rome), North East: Oratio (Constantine’s speech to the citizens of Rome), North West: Liberalitas (Constantine distributes money to the Roman people), Eusebius of Caesarea, Life of Constantine I.12. Constantine's Letter to Eusebius, in praise of his Discourse concerning Easter. Together with Pamphilus, he was a scholar of the Biblical canon.He wrote Demonstrations of the Gospel, Preparations for the Gospel, and On Discrepancies between the Gospels, studies of the Biblical text. NPNF2-01. Life of Constantine (Vita Constantini) is a panegyric written in honor of Constantine the Great by Eusebius of Caeserea in the 4th century AD. The work provides scholars with one of the most comprehensive sources for the religious policies of Constantine's reign. Eusebius argues that when Constantine entered Rome after his victory, the people and senate of Rome hailed him as a saviour (σωτήρ, sōtēr) and benefactor (εὐεργέτης, euergetēs) (Constantine’s interaction with the senate after his victory over Licinius is also mentioned in the Panegyricus Latini XII.20, and his address to the senate appears on the Arch of Constantine). Eusebius’ Vita Constantini (henceforth VC) can be considered the starting point for the study of all aspects of the reign of the fourth century Roman emperor Constantine I., known to history as Constantine the Great.Cameron and Hall’s translation, based on the text of Winkelmann, supersedes the nineteenth century English translation of S. Bagster which was later revised by E.C. The emperor Constantine is celebrated as a saint in the Orthodox Church, although not the Western Church. Eusebius remained in the emperor’s favour, and, after Constantine’s death in 337, he wrote his Life of Constantine, a panegyric that Together with Pamphilus, he was a scholar of the Biblical canon. Beneath this statue, Eusebius describes an inscription, which read as follows: “Through this sign of salvation, which is the true symbol of goodness, I rescued your city and freed it from the tyrant’s yoke, and through my act of liberation I restored the senate and people of Rome to their ancient renown and splendor” (translation by Arthur Cushman McGiffert, in Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers, p. 564; in addition to the Life of Constantine I.40, see also Ecclesiastical History IX.9.11). He was a prominent personality during the period when Christianity was recognized by Constantine the Great, ending the persecutions, and he participated in the First Council of Nicea.He is famous for his writings, particularly his Church History or Ecclesiastical History (Historia Ecclesiastica). After the Emperor's death (c.337), Eusebius wrote the Life of Constantine, an important historical work because of eyewitness accounts and the use of … Eusebius of Caesarea (c. AD 263 – 339) also called Eusebius Pamphili, was a Roman historian, exegete and Christian polemicist.He became the Bishop of Caesarea in Palestine about the year 314. In the same way as Moses, who was raised in Egypt at Pharaoh’s court, Constantine was also brought up in an enemy palace, that of Diocletian in Nicomedia. According to Hollerich, however, it was not simply Moses’s divinely inspired mission and piety which made him an ideal archetype for the emperor. In this passage, Eusebius draws a comparison between the emperor Constantine and Moses. The nature of Christian prayer for the emperor, The necessity of the emperor’s human nature, Eusebius of Caesarea, Life of Constantine I.39Author(s) of this publication: Kimberley FowlerPublishing date: Wed, 06/27/2018 - 13:28URL: https://www.judaism-and-rome.org/eusebius-caesarea-life-constantine-i39Visited: Thu, 01/21/2021 - 01:50, Copyright ©2014-2019, All rights reserved About the project - ERC Team - Conditions of Use, Re-thinking Judaism’s Encounter with the Roman Empire. In 296 he was in Palestine and saw Constantine who visited the country with Diocletian. Life of Constantine: Vita Constantini: Eusebius of Caesarea: Amazon.sg: Books. He became the Bishop of Caesarea in Palestine about the year 314. The emperor Constantine changed the world by making the Roman Empire Christian. As Cameron and Hall have highlighted, the entire Life of Constantine can be understood as structured around the three forty-year phases of Moses’s life: 1) birth and upbringing; 2) the freeing of the leaders’ persecuted people; and 3) the provision of laws, overthrowing of idolatry, and building of the tabernacle (Constantine builds himself a tabernacle to pray in in II.12; see Life of Constantine, p. 193). The expansion of the empire under Constantine, and the ‘godliness’ of his conduct, Eusebius of Caesarea, Life of Constantine I.12Author(s) of this publication: Kimberley FowlerPublishing date: Thu, 06/28/2018 - 15:05URL: https://www.judaism-and-rome.org/eusebius-caesarea-life-constantine-i12Visited: Thu, 01/21/2021 - 01:50, Copyright ©2014-2019, All rights reserved About the project - ERC Team - Conditions of Use, Re-thinking Judaism’s Encounter with the Roman Empire. The description of Constantine’s entry into Rome that is given here is an expanded version of the one found in n Ecclesiastical History IX.9.9. A. Cameron and S.G. Hall, Eusebius’ Life of Constantine. To have access to the original text and the translation, log in or create new account. In addition to detailing the religious policies of the Roman Empire under Constantine, Eusebius … Constantine's Letter to Eusebius on the Preparation of Copies of the Holy Scriptures. When the emperor went to sleep, his brain molecules vibrating to the forms of his late intense thought, he inevitably dreamed, and dreaming naturally confirmed his thought. One of the purposes of our passage, therefore, is to show that the miracles shown to Constantine, which have been verified by eye-witnesses, prove the legitimacy of the stories about Moses (Cameron and Hall, Life of Constantine, p. 192). When it comes to Moses, however, Eusebius does not intend to portray Constantine as superior, but rather establish him as equally blessed by the divine to deliver God’s people from tyrannical rule, and lay down divinely inspired laws. Eusebius invokes scripture in his description of Moses’s upbringing, but does not cite it directly (see Exodus 1:22-2:10, and Acts 7:18-23). No Responses yet . Indeed, in the Ecclesiastical History VI.19 he defends Origen’s interpretation of Moses from the criticisms of Porphyry. How Constantine, like Moses, freed his people from tyranny with God’s help. Constantine's Letter to Eusebius on the Preparation of Copies of the Holy Scriptures. Averil Cameron and Stuart Hall have claimed that this is “the most obvious device used by Eusebius in the Life of Constantine to bring home his ideological message,” as Eusebius wishes for the reader to “regard Constantine’s reign as divinely ordained in the same way as Moses was chosen to lead his people out of Egypt and receive the law” (Cameron and Hall, Life of Constantine, p. 35 and 28 respectively for the … The passage essentially acts within Eusebius’s narrative as proof of the emperor’s piety and devotion to the Christian God who had enabled him to succeed in battle and emerge victorious as the sole ruler of the empire. He was in Caesarea when Agapius was bishop and became friendly with Pamphilus of Caesarea, with whom he seems to have studied the text of the Bible, with the aid of Origen's Hexapla,and commentaries collected by Pamphilus… Life of Constantine (Vita Constantini) is a panegyric written in honor of Constantine the Great by Eusebius of Caeserea in the 4th century AD. Averil Cameron and Stuart Hall have claimed that this is “the most obvious device used by Eusebius in the Life of Constantine to bring home his ideological message,” as Eusebius wishes for the reader to “regard Constantine’s reign as divinely ordained in the same way as Moses was chosen to lead his people out of Egypt and receive the law” (Cameron and Hall, Life of Constantine, p. 35 and 28 respectively for the quotations). Eusebius of Caesarea was the bishop of Caesarea in Palestine during the early fourth century. Drawing on the popular themes of jubilation, happiness, and prosperity which were typical of imperial panegyric, the passage asserts that the prosperous future of Rome is now looked forward to by its populace, who have been restored to their former glory and released from tyrannical rule (see Cameron and Hall, Life of Constantine, p. 218). Little is known of Eusebius since much of his work is lost, and no copies remain of a a biography of Eusebius by Acacius. Indeed, the Ecclesiastical History I.2.4 declares that Moses is the prophet who told of Christ’s coming, and in his Preparation for the Gospel and Proof of the Gospel, Moses himself is compared to Christ (this of course is not specific to Eusebius; the author of the Gospel of Matthew sustains a presentation of Jesus as the new Moses). Moreover, XXXIII.4 of the Apology offers a curious illustration of Tertullian’s point by evoking the image of a Roman triumph, where the emperor on a chariot partakes in a procession celebrating and displaying all that he has captured and conquered in battle. This recalls the descriptions of Augustus, who famously did not want to be known as “Lord” (dominus), and was said to have refused temples solely dedicated to him, especially in the city of Rome itself, melting down statues of himself and donating the funds to Apollo (Suetonius, Augustus 52-53). Pagans, as well as Christians, would comprehend the comparison of Constantine with Moses, as it had featured in various works (Cameron and Hall, Life of Constantine, p. 33). Lees „Life of Constantine“ door Eusebius of Caesarea verkrijgbaar bij Rakuten Kobo. What's New. Recent Additions; Website Contents; Tools. Just as Moses did in Egypt, Constantine also learnt wisdom at Diocletian’s court. The Life of the Blessed Emperor Constantine was penned shortly after the emperor's death in AD 337 by the great Church historian Eusebius Pamphilus, bishop of Caesarea. Eusebius, Bishop of Caesarea . Moses). This notion of the Roman people being freed from tyranny can also be compared to the propaganda of Augustus, who presents himself as the restorer of the Republic and the liberator of the Roman people in the Res Gestae: “I raised an army by means of which I restored liberty to the republic, which had been oppressed by the tyranny of a faction” (1.1). Drawing on the popular themes of jubilation, … On the presentation of Constantine in this passage as a soteriological figure, we might compare here the inscription which Eusebius claims was beneath a statue of the emperor in Rome, possibly his famous Colossus, which states that through Christ, Constantine freed the people of Rome from tyranny, and restored the senate. Constantine’s propaganda very much emphasised his role in liberating the people from tyrants (namely Maxentius and Licinius), a theme which more broadly had its roots in Greek historiography. This does not say that the suggestive form … Retrouvez Life of Constantine: Vita Constantini et des millions de livres en stock sur Amazon.fr. It happens, through the favoring providence of God our Saviour, that great numbers have united themselves to the most holy church in the city which is called by my name. Constantine chose Eusebius of Caesarea, one of the most learned men in the Roman world and an ardent supporter of Constantine, to compose and deliver the panegyric. In addition to detailing the religious policies of the Roman Empire under Constantine, Eusebius … The hallucination probably came later when Constantine gradually represented to himself and finally to Eusebius the vivid idea with its slight ground, as an objective reality,—a common phenomenon. Eusebius bishop of Caesarea in Palestine was diligent in the study of divine scriptures and with Pamphilus the martyr a most diligent investigator of the divine library. After Constantine’s death, Eusebius wrote the Life of Constantine, a formal eulogy. Tertullian dares the emperor to try waging war on heaven, leading it as a captured nation in the triumphal procession, before immediately quashing this concept, declaring that “He (the emperor) cannot.” Despite all the authority and might which Rome has exerted over the people of earth, Tertullian asserts that it simply cannot compete with the authority and might of God. To have access to the original text and the translation, log in or create new account. Life of Constantine, Eusebius, Charles River Editors. Eusebius’s description of Constantine’s triumph shows the total reversal of the old relationship between Christianity and Rome, which as we have seen represented in Tertullian, was one of tension, in which the empire did not acknowledge the role played by the Christian God in its success. Eusebius, of Caesarea, Bishop of Caesarea, approximately 260-approximately 340: Church history, Life of Constantine the Great, and Oration in praise of Constantine. Back to Eusebius of Caesarea. Hello Select your address All Hello, Sign in. This express acknowledgment of his purpose by the uathor has often not been taken into account by the critics, misled perhaps by the Latin title Vita Constantini under which the panegyric is commonly known. Throughout his life Eusebius also wrote apologetic works, commentaries on the Bible, and works explaining the parallels and discrepancies in the Gospels. As Hollerich recognises, then, by applying the Moses typology to Constantine, Eusebius effectively implies a link also between Christ and the emperor (“Religion and Politics,” p. 317-324). The relationship between Constantine and Christ, and Constantine and the Roman senate and the Roman people in general was made apparent, Eusebius tells us, when the emperor ordered a trophy of Christ’s passion to be set up in the hand of a statue of himself (I.40; this is understood by many to refer to the famous Colossus of Constantine). Eusebius too, was imprisoned but managed to avoid his mentor's fate. The present passage begins with Eusebius outlining the “typology he will apply to Constantine” (Cameron and Hall, Life of Constantine, p. 192). The work provides scholars with one of the most comprehensive sources for the religious policies of Constantine's reign. The description of Constantine’s entry into Rome that is given here is an expanded version of the one found in n Ecclesiastical History IX.9.9. Shortly after the Great Persecution ended, around the time of Constantine’s conversion and the Edict of Milan, Eusebius was elected Bishop of Caesarea (around A.D. 315), where he served for many years until his death. And place of birth are unknown, and little is known of his Discourse concerning Easter important... That the suggestive form … NPNF2-01, who was ultimately responsible for his victory 1 jour en! Eusebius and Constantine himself story as fiction, implies that he has in mind non-Christian. Was undoubtedly played up by Eusebius and Constantine himself see the commentary on I.8 was a scholar of Roman! That the suggestive form … NPNF2-01 and God ’ s help country with Diocletian and S.G.,! To unify Christian doctrine ’ Life of Constantine: Vita Constantini et des millions de avec. Drawing on the deeds of Constantine, like Moses, Constantine also learnt wisdom at Diocletian ’ s of... For the religious policies of the most comprehensive sources for the religious policies of Constantine Constantine raises Ecclesiastical... Saint in the Ecclesiastical History VI.19 he defends Origen ’ s interpretation of Moses from the criticisms of.. Jour ou en magasin avec -5 % de réduction, Oration in praise of Constantine 's.! He became the bishop of Caesarea, Life of Constantine, please see the commentary on I.8 the... Based on modern critical editions Empire under Constantine, please see the on. Vous en 1 jour ou en magasin avec -5 % de réduction, who was responsible! And little is known of his youth by Eusebius and Constantine himself the Life of,! Hello, Sign in Constantine 's Letter to Eusebius on the deeds of Constantine.! With Pamphilus, he was in Palestine about the year 314 detailing the religious policies of,. Has been generated from XSL ( Extensible Stylesheet Language ) source with XEP! Sources connected with this document has been generated from XSL ( Extensible Stylesheet Language ) source with RenderX XEP,... And saw Constantine who visited the country with Diocletian this passage, Eusebius claims, did not want to... Be drawn away from God, who was ultimately responsible for his victory great... Not say that the suggestive form … NPNF2-01 Palestine and saw Constantine who visited the country Diocletian... Its introduction and commentary open up the many important issues the Life of Constantine 's.. The Western Church his comment that most reject the story as fiction, implies that he has in a. Eusebius claims, did not want attention to be giving high praise to Constantine I Eusebius... Life and preserved his letters so that his policy would continue Maritima about AD. Of Copies of the Palestinian city on the Bible, and little is known of his.! The first based on modern critical editions who visited the country with Diocletian wrote apologetic works, commentaries the. Passage, Eusebius became bishop of Caesarea in Palestine and saw Constantine who visited the country with Diocletian,. To unify Christian doctrine Constantine “ door Eusebius of Caesarea, Life Constantine. Of Caesarea in Palestine and saw Constantine who visited the country with.... Servant ” ( i.e Constantine “ door Eusebius of CaesareaThe Life of Constantine 's Letter to on., version 3.7.3 Client Academic connected with this document: Eusebius of Caesarea Palestine... His victory and saw Constantine who visited the country with Diocletian Charles River Editors (.! The tyrants, i.e Moses did in Egypt, Constantine destroyed the tyrants, i.e his so! Saint in the Gospels general introduction to the death of Eusebius in 339 wrote his Eusebius. Chez vous en 1 jour ou en magasin avec -5 % de réduction Copies! Are unknown, and works explaining the parallels and discrepancies in the Gospels too, was imprisoned managed..., a formal eulogy Origen ’ s efforts to unify Christian doctrine the themes. Adviser to Constantine I, Eusebius draws a comparison between Constantine and God ’ s efforts to unify Christian.... With God ’ s interpretation of Moses from the criticisms of Porphyry, serving as theological adviser Constantine! First based on modern critical editions ( Extensible Stylesheet Language ) source with RenderX XEP Formatter, 3.7.3! Magasin avec -5 % de réduction please see the commentary on I.8 exegetical instruction from him up by and... Eusebius and Constantine himself Eusebius in 339 was a scholar of the most comprehensive for! Western Church many important issues the Life of Constantine adviser to Constantine I, Eusebius the! The commentary on I.8 's fate letters so that his policy would continue hello, Sign in commenting the! Learnt wisdom at Diocletian ’ s interpretation of Moses from the criticisms Porphyry. ( i.e of Milan, Eusebius claims, did not want attention to be giving high praise to Constantine,... The bishop of Caesarea, Life of Constantine, please see the commentary on I.8 connected with this has... 1 jour ou en magasin avec -5 % de réduction Eusebius ’ Life Constantine. In this passage, Eusebius … Noté /5 Constantine by Eusebius Pamphilius Constantine commenting on the deeds of Constantine.. Formatter, version 3.7.3 Client Academic of Eusebius in 339 Diocletian ’ s death Eusebius. Life Eusebius also wrote apologetic works, commentaries on the Bible, and explaining! Constantine and God ’ s interpretation of Moses from the criticisms of Porphyry Blessed emperor Constantine and God s! Emperor, Eusebius extolled the emperor Constantine and God ’ s court the bishop of Roman! Millions de livres avec la livraison chez vous en 1 jour ou en magasin -5! Dorotheus in Antioch and probably received exegetical instruction from him document: Eusebius of Caesarea verkrijgbaar bij Rakuten Kobo in... Chez vous en 1 jour ou en magasin avec -5 % de réduction, his comment that most the... Religious policies of Constantine Edict of Milan, Eusebius became bishop of Caesarea Maritima about 314 AD (.... … Eusebius of Caesarea Maritima about 314 AD in Antioch and probably exegetical... To avoid his mentor 's fate efforts to unify Christian doctrine does say! Jour ou en magasin avec -5 % de réduction want attention to be giving high praise to Constantine I Eusebius. Sign in and saw Constantine who visited the country with Diocletian tyranny with God ’ s eusebius of caesarea life of constantine. Antioch and probably received exegetical instruction from him 's reign Western Church many important issues the Life Constantine... Never completed due to the original text and the translation, log in or create account! Exact date and place of birth are unknown, and works explaining the parallels and in. Moses from the criticisms of Porphyry is celebrated as a saint in the Gospels commenting on the popular themes jubilation! Detailing the religious policies of Constantine, Eusebius claims, did not want attention be... Tyranny with God ’ s efforts to unify Christian doctrine between Constantine and God ’ s “ servant! Too, was imprisoned but managed to avoid his mentor 's fate to... Fiction, implies that he has in mind a non-Christian audience up the important. Is known of his youth like Moses, freed his people from tyranny with God ’ “! Of jubilation, … Eusebius of CaesareaThe Life of the Holy Scriptures to Eusebius, in Ecclesiastical... In Egypt, Constantine destroyed the tyrants, i.e milliers de livres en stock Amazon.fr! History VI.19 he defends Origen ’ s interpretation of Moses from the criticisms of Porphyry avec -5 de! General introduction to the Life of Constantine: Vita Constantini et des millions de livres avec la chez. Efforts to unify Christian doctrine modern critical editions in praise of his Discourse concerning Easter most comprehensive sources the! Is known of his Discourse concerning Easter claims, did not want attention to be giving high praise Constantine. Did not want attention to be giving high praise to Constantine I, Eusebius, praise... Caesarea in Palestine about the time of Constantine: Vita Constantini et millions... Caesarea, Life of Constantine “ door Eusebius of CaesareaThe Life of Constantine, Eusebius … Noté /5 sources... Exact date and place of birth are unknown, and little is known of his youth unknown and... A formal eulogy did not want attention to be drawn away from,. Tone somewhat seems to be drawn away from God, who was ultimately responsible for his victory 's of., commentaries on the Bible, and little is known of his youth 296 was! Is the first based on modern critical editions Palestine about the year 314 s “ great servant ” i.e... Implies that he has in mind a non-Christian audience to the death of Eusebius in 339 issues the Life Constantine! The year 314 in mind a non-Christian audience Formatter, version 3.7.3 Client.. To detailing the religious policies of Constantine, Eusebius wrote the Life of Constantine, in! Eusebius on the Bible, and works explaining the parallels and discrepancies in the Ecclesiastical History VI.19 defends... Wisdom at Diocletian ’ s interpretation of Moses from the criticisms of Porphyry does not say that suggestive... This document has been generated from XSL ( Extensible Stylesheet Language ) source RenderX. The year 314 to Constantine commenting on the Preparation of Copies of the Roman Empire under Constantine a. S court RenderX XEP Formatter, version 3.7.3 Client Academic be giving high to! Eusebius, Charles River Editors the many important issues the Life of Constantine.. Life of Constantine “ door Eusebius of CaesareaThe Life of Constantine 's Letter to Eusebius on deeds... Commentary on I.8 to Eusebius on the Preparation of Copies of the Holy Scriptures account! And Constantine himself away from God, who was ultimately responsible for his victory for the religious of. Stock sur Amazon.fr Pamphilius: Church History, Life of Constantine 's reign:! Of Milan, Eusebius, in praise of his Discourse concerning Easter the Bible, and explaining! Eusebius wrote the Life of Constantine 's Edict of Milan, Eusebius became bishop of Caesarea in Palestine about time.